Gathering of the Clan
http://flyanglers.org/forum/

This is my number 001
http://flyanglers.org/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=41
Page 1 of 2

Author:  Brian Greer [ Wed Oct 25, 2017 1:46 pm ]
Post subject:  This is my number 001

Before the demise of the old website, I had a post in the rod building folder about setting up shop to make my own bamboo rods from the culm. I had some pictures of tool set up; my lathe, wrapping station, a few other tools. I also had some pics of early progress of rod #001. I had pics of the chunk of walnut for the reel seat spacer and of the correct silk thread for wraps.

Fast forward to present time... I now have that rod finished and have even fished it a couple times.

Here are some pictures of the finished product:

It is a 2 piece / 2 tip rod made on the 8013 Lyle Dickerson taper. The taper that I planed the strips to were measured from an original 8013 that was made in 1949. I picked that specific taper because it is supposed to be a little faster than the taper that was measured from a 1951 rod.
Image

The reel seat is close to what Dickerson used. A down locking reel seat with large 'ACME' type threads, diamond knurling on the locking ring and a pocketed butt cap. His spacers were usually straight grained walnut. Carl gave me some walnut pieces a few years back and this piece I selected fits the bill nicely.
Image

This pic is a little fuzzy but it shows the rod inscription and the signature wraps that Dickerson often used.
Image

Here is a close-up of the signature wraps. I found some silk that is the same as what Dickerson used all those years ago. The thread manufacturer went out of business a long time ago. I was lucky to find the correct size and shade of silk. You might be surprised at what some old spools of silk might bring on the market today.
Image

This stripping guide is is an agate guide from Joe Arguello. From research, I found that Dickerson did use some agate stripping guides, but they were a bit different in style. This guide was just too nice not to use it.
Image

Here are three guide wraps. I just thought the picture turned out nicely.
Image

The two tip sections, with my initials and dots to denote tip 1 from tip 2.
Image

The three ferrules. Made from nickel silver, polished and blued.
Image

Overall, I am more than pleased with the rod. There were a lot of bumps along the way. I over lapped one of the male ferrules and had to trash that ferrule and start over with a new one. I had the female ferrule come off of the butt section. The fit was too tight and the glue bond was too weak. That was an easy fix. I used an epoxy that I have more confidence with and rethought how my ferrules should fit.

I tried a few different 5wt lines on the rod until I found one that spoke to me. The rod casts very well for me and can produce enough distance for the places that I fish. On Tuesday, I was fishing in some pretty nasty wind and was able to cast a weighted leach without too much trouble.

I don't think that any rod is perfect. Every rod will have flaws, some more than others, and some more major than others. I think that each rod maker tries to make the best rod that he or she can make. And rod makers get better along their journey. They go over how they do each step and see how they can make that step easier, or how they can get better results. I revamped my whole varnish setup. I've used several different methods to varnish rods. I've tried wiping it on, I've tried using a conventional brush but neither of those gave me acceptable results. I've sprayed varnish with an airbrush on a couple of rods. After a little practice that gave good results, but the set up time and clean up time was just too much. I used the "turkey baster" method for a while. That's where you slowly pour thinned varnish down the rod section and catch the runoff in a cup. That worked well, too. I finally settled on using a dip tube. I cobbled together a small spindle on a little DC motor. I got a DC power supply and a PWM (Pulse Width Mudulation) board. Those things along with a double throw switch and a rheostat, I made an adjustable set up to withdraw the rod sections from the dip tube. I can control up and down as well as how fast I want to withdraw the rod section. It is much nicer than my old setup that had only one speed and since it was an AC motor, I didn't know which way it was going to turn when I turned it on.

I've recently gotten a machine to rough strips into triangles. That will save a lot of needless labor; taking split strips and hogging off material just to get them anywhere close to the dimension that is needed. I also bought a 4 string binder to bind sections when gluing them up. Two strings rotate in one direction, 180 degrees apart. That keeps the tension on the rod even as the string is being put on the rod section. The other two strings rotate in the opposite direction of the other two. That is to offset any twist that wrapping only in one direction would produce.

I just have a couple odds and ends to buy...clamps, small tools, etc.
My next big purchase will to buy bundles of raw bamboo. :)

Author:  Gene L [ Wed Oct 25, 2017 2:01 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: This is my number 001

Beautiful rod! Good work there; I'm sure it took you a long time to achieve such perfection

Author:  Dr. Trout Bum [ Wed Oct 25, 2017 2:23 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: This is my number 001

Wow, Brian, that looks fantastic! Thanks for sharing all of that about your experience. Keep posting your experiences and evolution so we can make rods vicariously through you.

Author:  Colston Newton [ Wed Oct 25, 2017 7:43 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: This is my number 001

Gorgeous!

Author:  Satchel [ Thu Oct 26, 2017 4:20 am ]
Post subject:  Re: This is my number 001

Beautiful job Brian. Very pretty rod.

On the varnish application. My friend Jerry has done all the experimentation over his years of building and finally settled on using the cheap black foam disposable brushes. I was sort of aghast that he would use such an unconventional approach. He said he uses what he's found to put the best finish on with the least hassle. I sure can't argue with his results. Anyway, just thought I'd pass that along for your trivial knowledge bank.

Author:  Brian Greer [ Thu Oct 26, 2017 7:19 am ]
Post subject:  Re: This is my number 001

Satch,

I met Jerry this past weekend at the Southern Rodmakers Gathering. He was a really nice guy. Dennis Bertram and Jerry did a program on hollow building rods. They talked of the theory and math behind it and talked of different hollowing techniques.

Out in the casting yard I messed around with one of his really long rods. I'm no spey caster, but that rod would lay out a lot of line with some pretty minimal effort.

I know of a few guys that use foam to apply varnish. Some use the black foam paint brushes, some guys use those foam wedges that women use to apply makeup. I personally shy away from this method for worry of getting varnish onto flats adjacent to the one that I am applying varnish to. I think I've settled on my dip set up. It took a while of thinking and building to get where I'm at. I have a variable speed motor that is infinitely adjustable and has an up/down switch. I prep the strip, hook it onto my string, crank up the speed and lower it into the tube. When it gets near the the level of immersion I want, I slow it way down until it gets just to the point that I want. This keeps any varnish off of the cork grip, etc. Then I flip a switch and raise the rod section at the speed I want. The speed depends on the temp & viscosity of the varnish. Then I sit back until it is fully withdrawn. No runs, no drips, no errors.

Author:  Brian Greer [ Thu Oct 26, 2017 7:21 am ]
Post subject:  Re: This is my number 001

Satch,

I met Jerry this past weekend at the Southern Rodmakers Gathering. He was a really nice guy. Dennis Bertram and Jerry did a program on hollow building rods. They talked of the theory and math behind it and talked of different hollowing techniques.

Out in the casting yard I messed around with one of his really long rods. I'm no spey caster, but that rod would lay out a lot of line with some pretty minimal effort.

I know of a few guys that use foam to apply varnish. Some use the black foam paint brushes, some guys use those foam wedges that women use to apply makeup. I personally shy away from this method for worry of getting varnish onto flats adjacent to the one that I am applying varnish to. I'm also not sure how one would use this method effectively with the guides already wrapped on a rod. I have settled on my dip set up. It took a while of thinking and building to get where I'm at. I have a variable speed motor that is infinitely adjustable and has an up/down switch. I prep the strip, hook it onto my string, crank up the speed and lower it into the tube. When it gets near the the level of immersion I want, I slow it way down until it gets just to the point that I want. This keeps any varnish off of the cork grip, etc. Then I flip a switch and raise the rod section at the speed I want. The speed depends on the temp & viscosity of the varnish. Then I sit back until it is fully withdrawn. No runs, no drips, no errors.

Author:  nielson [ Fri Oct 27, 2017 6:59 am ]
Post subject:  Re: This is my number 001

Well done Brian -- looks as good as it gets! I'm not familiar with classic bamboo tapers so tell me, is it an 8 footer?
Jim

Author:  Brian Greer [ Fri Oct 27, 2017 8:22 am ]
Post subject:  Re: This is my number 001

Thanks for the kind words Jim!

Yes, it is an 8ft rod for a 5wt line. It weighs just over 4oz.

It seems that just about each of the classic rod makers had their model number that described their rod, or something specific about their rod in some way.

Dickerson used the length of the rod and the size of the ferrule. My 8013 is 8ft 0inches with a 13/64 ferrule.
An 8615 is 8ft 6in long with a 15/64 ferrule. The three pieces were similarly named. An 861711 is a three piece that is 8ft 6in long with 17/64 and 11/64 ferrules.

Granger did their model names by length and weight. A Granger 8040 is 8ft 0inches long and weighs 4ounces and 0 quarter ounces. A 7633 is 7ft 6in long and weight 3ounces and 3/4ounce. No designations between 2 or 3 piece.

I believe Payne and Garrison used a dimension at a certain spot on the rod blank for their model number. I think that a Payne 101 has a dimension of .101 inch at a certain spot along the blank.....near a ferrule if recall. If I am correct, Garrison used a spot at 50inches....so a 212 would measure .212 inches at the 50 inch mark from the tip. However there is a 212E model that is beefier than the 212, so it will naturally be a larger dimension at the 50 inch mark.

I'll have to look into the Payne and Garrison info a little more to make sure that is correct information.

edit: Correction: Payne 2 piece rod models were named for the size of *one strip* (1/2 the rod dimension) at the bamboo station under the ferrule. The 3 piece models were different. They were either measured one strip's dimension under the tip to mid section ferrule or was measured the full diameter at the mid point of the rod. These are pretty much generalizations and can and do vary through the years.

Author:  Satchel [ Fri Oct 27, 2017 2:52 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: This is my number 001

Jerry is a heck of a guy. I have a 7'6" 4 wt of his that is just a wonderful rod. Jerry is building some BIG rods. Was it Brutus that you cast? That thing isn't just a canon, it's Howitzer. I've learned more about casting from Jerry than anybody else. He's a certified casting instructor
and is the one guy I know who can pick up any rod and within about 6 casts he will get the maximum out of that rod. He's also a heck of a fisherman. I've seen him catch Steelhead when nobody else could even get a bump. Glad you got to meet him. If you saw his shop you'd just shake your head. He's the prime example of making the most of what you've got. It's literally a corner of his basement. Very intelligent guy.

Page 1 of 2 All times are UTC - 5 hours
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group
http://www.phpbb.com/